Title I Summary

 

 

Escalante Valley School is a schoolwide Title I school.  We use funds from Title I and other Federal education programs and resources to upgrade the entire educational program of the school in order to raise academic achievement for all students.

The purpose of a schoolwide program is to improve the academic achievement of every student, particularly the lowest achieving students, so they will demonstrate proficiency related to the Utah State Core Standards. Decisions for the use of the funds are made in coordination with the district and school.  The funds are used in ways to best meet the needs of the students at Escalante Valley.     

Escalante Valley School meets on a regular basis with its administrator, teachers, PTA, and community council to develop and review its comprehensive Title I plan. We make changes as needed to meet the needs of our students.

Escalante Valley has highly qualified teachers in all grade level areas.  We use highly qualified paraprofessionals to supplement the students’ regular classroom learning by, tutoring students who fall below benchmark, using the Early Steps/Next Steps tutorial and Star Tutoring models.  We also use Waterford Early Intervention, Successmaker, Imagine Learning, and Reading Horizon Software to meet individual student needs.    Teachers meet and coordinate student progress weekly with these paraprofessionals. Collaboration between teachers, paraprofessionals, and the school title I teachers are an integral part of our Title I program. We use DIBELS screening, SAGE assessment scores, and the ERSI and RLA diagnostic tests to determine need and place students in tutoring on their appropriate instructional level of learning.  Title I funds are used to provide full day kindergarten to all students. Title I funds also provide a half time councilor for Escalante Valley School. Title I also provide money for our teachers grade K-6. Title one provides “Imagine Learning” computer program for all ESL students 30 minutes a day. All ESL students are in a regular classroom with a highly qualified teacher.      

Escalante Valley School follows all Title I requirements for parental involvement. We provide all parents with regular, meaningful, two-way communication involving the students’ academic learning.

The Title I school wide program at our school highly impacts the learning of the students.          

 
 

Title I Plan

 

Escalante Valley Elementary School

 

 

School Name:

Parowan Elementary

 

LEA Name: 

Iron County School District

 

 

Name

 

Title I Schoolwide Planning Team

 

Signature

 

Trevor Heaton

Principal

 

Trevor Heaton

Title I facilitator or coordinator

 

Jeanette Putnam

Faculty member

 

Jill Schill

Faculty member

 

Michelle Jones

Faculty member

 

Julie Platt

Parent representative

 

                           Tiffany Christensen

Parent representative

 

                           Lacey Platt

Parent representative

 

 

 

 

 

 Developing the Title I schoolwide plan: Schoolwide plans are developed with the involvement of parents and other members of the community to be served and individuals who will carry out such plans.

 

 

Title I Director          Steven Burton

 

 

Signature                  __________________________

 

1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment

     ESEA 1114(b)(1)(A)

    Refer to item # 6 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

Schoolwide project schools have conducted a comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school, based on the information about the performance of children in relation to the state content and student performance standards (Utah State Core Curriculum).  Quality needs assessments include multiple sources of data. Some to consider are:

 

Student achievement trends

 

 

Print SAGE reports

 

Graduation rates (for high schools only)

 

 

 

 

Demographic data

 

Print demographic reports

 

 

School climate (including safe school data)

 

Get from Kevin

Copy of end of year parent evaluation/student evaluations

 

 

Course-taking patterns (secondary only)

 

 

 

 

Teacher qualifications

 

 

 

 

Participation in college entrance testing (high school only)

 

 

Other data as determined by the school

 

 

 

 

2. Schoolwide Reform Strategies

     ESEA 1114(b)(1)(B)

    Refer to items #7 and #15 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

For schools approved by the LEA to operate a schoolwide program, required schoolwide reform strategies are selected and implemented.

 

Describe the strategies and the accompanying action steps that will be used to improve student achievement. Use the following form to guide the planning.  Please duplicate the form on the following page as needed for each goal.

 

Based on our needs assessment, we have set the following goals:

 

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>In language arts, students will be able to integrate and evaluate content from diverse formats, and analyze how two or more texts address similar themes and/or topics.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>In math, students will understand fractions, operations with fractions, and the ability to manipulate fractions in multiple step problems.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Teachers and staff will develop and implement a school-wide behavior plan that will include procedures for behavior before school, during lunch, and after school.

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide Reform Goals and Strategies Form

(Complete one page for each goal.)

 

School-wide Goals: Goals must be directly related to the results of the comprehensive needs assessment and directly tied to the Utah State Core Curriculum.  Goals must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-based (SMART). 

Goal #1

In language arts, The students at Escalante Valley School struggled to compare similar themes or topics. They also struggle to break apart and find evidence to support a claim.

 

Strategies

Teachers will use our new reading program, Core Knowledge Language Arts (CKLA), with fidelity.  This program is designed to meet our Language Arts goal and builds on the goal throughout the grade levels.  Teachers will allocate more instructional time to comparing similar themes and topics.

Scientifically Based Research Support

To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.

 

Common Core State Standards Initiative:  Preparing America’s Students for College and Career

 

Expected Impact in Core Academic Areas

(How will success be measured on an annual basis?)

We will increase both Proficiency and MGP by 5 percentage points on the SAGE Assessment.  From 64% to 69% Proficient and MGP from 56% to 61%.   

 

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Teachers develop formative assessments on a weekly basis to measure progress 

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Sage test 3 times per year (two formative, one summative)

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Teacher observations implementing the tier 1 strategies to engage all learners allowing for maximum learning

 

Professional Development to Support Strategies

Teachers will meet bi-weekly in lower and upper grade-level teams to discuss progress on the goal and develop assessments to determine progress. CTT’s meet one week to prepare the assessments and the next week to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment.  STT’s meet bi-weekly with the CTT members and report back to the STT team on the effectiveness of the meetings and the success of the assessments. STTs will support and guide CTTs. We have attended a whole brain training to help in management.  We are currently involved in an Assessment to Achievement training which helps to maintain a professional collaborative environment at our school.

 

 

 

 

Timeline

 

Ongoing

Responsible Parties

Classroom teachers, Special Ed teachers, Principal

Evaluation Process

(How will the school monitor the implementation of the strategies and action steps associated with this goal?)

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Ongoing, informal assessment

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>SAGE interim and summative assessments

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Teachers are monitored when they are observed in classrooms and observed in meetings and reported on during STT meetings.  

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Students are monitored bi-monthly by the teacher team (CTT) giving and evaluating the assessments.  Once per month, all teachers meet as a larger team to discuss progress on the goal and student progress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide Reform Goals and Strategies Form

(Complete one page for each goal.)

 

School-wide Goals: Goals must be directly related to the results of the comprehensive needs assessment and directly tied to the Utah State Core Curriculum.  Goals must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-based (SMART). 

Goal #2

MATH:  The students at Escalante Valley Elementary School struggle to write and Interpret numerical expressions.

 

Strategies

We will teach our Go-Math Program with fidelity.  Each school transformation team (STT), comprised of grade level teachers, will meet bi-monthly to create common skills assessments for math, specifically on numerical expression.  We will focus on our evidence based strategy of feedback. Each team will gather data and discuss data and student samples to drive future instruction. 

Scientifically Based Research Support

Only a small percentage of U.S. students possess the math­ematics knowledge needed to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, or math­ematics (STEM) fields. Many high school graduates lack the mathematical competence for a wide range of well-paying jobs in today’s economy. Moreover, large gaps in mathemat­ics knowledge exist among students from dif­ferent socioeconomic backgrounds and racial and ethnic groups within the United States. These disparities hurt the national economy and also limit tens of millions of Americans’ occupational and financial opportunities.

Poor understanding of fractions is a critical aspect of this inadequate mathematics knowl­edge. Knowledge of fractions differs even more between students in the United States and students in East Asia than does knowl­edge of whole numbers.  This learning gap is especially problematic because understanding fractions is essential for algebra and other more advanced areas of mathematics.

Teachers are aware of students’ difficulty in learning about fractions and often are frustrated by it. In a recent national poll, Algebra I teachers rated their students as having “very poor preparation in rational numbers and operations involving fractions and decimals.”  The algebra teachers ranked poor understanding of fractions as one of the two most important weaknesses in students’ preparation for their course.

 The lack of conceptual understanding has several facets, including

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Not viewing fractions as numbers at all, but rather as meaningless symbols that need to be manipulated in arbitrary ways to produce answers that satisfy a teacher.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Focusing on numerators and denominators as separate numbers rather than thinking.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Focusing on numerators and denominators as separate numbers rather than thinking of a fraction as a single number.  Errors such as believing that ? > ? arise from comparing the two denominators and ignoring the essential relation between each fraction’s numerator and its denominator.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Confusing properties of fractions with those of whole numbers.  This is evident in many high school students’ claim that just as there is no whole number between 5 and 6, there is no number of any type between 5/7 and 6/7.

Developing Effective Fraction and Writing of Numerical Expression Instruction for Kindergarten Through 6th Grade

Institute of Education Sciences (IES) National Center for Educational Evaluation and Regional Assistance


<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Expected Impact in Core Academic Areas

(How will success be measured on an annual basis?)

MATH: We will increase both Proficiency and MPG by 5 percentage points on the SAGE Assessment.  From 59% to 64% Proficient and MGP from 51% to 56% .

 

Teachers will use the chapter assessments in Go Math.  Students in grades 3-6 will also be assessed on the SAGE interim and summative tests.

Professional Development to Support Strategies

Teachers will meet bi-weekly in upper and lower grade llevel teams to discuss progress on the goal and develop assessments to determine progress. CTT’s meet bi-weekly to prepare the assessments and the next week to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment.  STT’s meet twice per week with the CTT members and report back to the STT team on the effectiveness of the meetings and the success of the assessments. STTs will support and guide CTTs.

 

Timeline

 

Ongoing

Responsible Parties

Classroom teachers, Special Ed teachers, Reading Specialists, Principal

Evaluation Process

(How will the school monitor the implementation of the strategies and action steps associated with this goal?)

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Ongoing, informal assessment

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>SAGE interim and summative assessments

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Teachers are monitored when they are observed in classrooms and observed in meetings and reported on during STT meetings.  

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Students are monitored bi-monthly by the teacher team (CTT) giving and evaluating the assessments.  Once per month, all teachers meet as a larger team to discuss progress on the goal and student progress.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Chapter assessments from Go Math

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schoolwide Reform Goals and Strategies Form

(Complete one page for each goal.)

 

School-wide Goals: Goals must be directly related to the results of the comprehensive needs assessment and directly tied to the Utah State Core Curriculum.  Goals must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-based (SMART). 

Goal #3

Escalante Valley Elementary School will have a minimum of 47.83% of their K-3 students make typical, above typical, and well-above typical growth from the BOY benchmark to the EOY benchmark.  This is the standard set by the state for the first year of structuring the uniform growth goal.

 

 

Strategies

All students will receive Tier I instruction in CKLA and those who are below benchmark will receive Early, Next, or Higher Steps by a highly qualified tutor 3-4 days a week in addition to their Tier I instruction.

 

Scientifically Based Research Support

Tier I instruction will be highly correlated with the Utah Core Standards in English Language Arts. 

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>The Tier I program is based on the most current research on the 3 critical components that support    comprehension: Academic/Domain Vocabulary, Fluency in Word and World Knowledge, and Background Knowledge to support comprehension of complex/academic text.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>ICSD will also use CKLA to teach systematic and sequential phonemic awareness and phonics as presented in Appendix A of the core standards to all students daily for 30 minutes as suggested by research.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Writing instruction will be scaffolded using an I do, we do, you do approach while teaching the writing process as supported by research.

The Tier II/III intervention program is based on scientific research at a gold standard.  

 

Expected Impact in Core Academic Areas

(How will success be measured on an annual basis?)

Students are expected in show literacy improvement on the SAGE assessment and DIBELS because the programs and teaching methods used strongly correlate with the assessments and the State Core Standards.  Success will be measured on an annual basis using SAGE, DIBELS, and the RLA.  Monthly progress monitoring will also be in place.

 

Professional Development to Support Strategies

CKLA trainers will provide training throughout the year to all teachers on effective implementation of the program.  Professional Development on CKLA will also be provided for the reading specialists by the district literacy coordinator.  The reading specialists will then provide training for the teachers and teaching assistants in their buildings.  The University of Utah Reading Clinic will provide a Tier I practicum for 4th grade teachers on helping all students to access grade level text.  Teaching assistants will be trained on the intervention by the district literacy coordinator and monitored by the school reading specialists to maintain high quality Tier II/III instruction.

Timeline

 

Reading specialists will be trained twice a month.  Reading specialists will offer schoolwide training once a month.  Tier I training from the U of U clinic will be monthly along with monthly observations.  Tier II/III training will be held in August along with ongoing monitoring throughout the year.

Responsible Parties

Classroom teachers, Special Ed teachers, Reading Specialists, Principal,

Evaluation Process

(How will the school monitor the implementation of the strategies and action steps associated with this goal?)

Teachers will be monitored through observations by Education Direction and their school principal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers

    ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(C)

   Refer to item #8 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

In schoolwide program schools, instruction must be provided by highly qualified staff. Either list the staff on this form or download a copy of the CACTUS Highly Qualified Teacher Report.

 

 

Name

Grade Level or Assignment

Degrees and Endorsements

# of Years in Education

Highly qualified

 

Krystal Munns

Reading Spec.

K-Extended  Day

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Special Education, Minor in Early Childhood

4

X

 

Fawn Hulet

 

K.

Bachelor of Arts, Endorsements in Early Childhood and Reading

32

X

 

Wendy Warrick

1st

 

Bachelor of Arts, Minor in Art

13

X

 

Jeanette Putnam

2nd

 

Master of Education, Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, Endorsement in Reading

15

X

 

Jill Schill

3rd

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, Endorsement in Math

11

X

 

Angela Harker

4th

 

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, Minor in Business

7

X

 

Michelle Jones

5th

 

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, Endorsement in Early Childhood and Math

11

X

 

Keenan Hart

6th

 

Master’s in Technology, Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education, Middle School Endorsement

34

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add additional lines as needed.

 

4. Professional Development Plan

    ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(D)

   Refer to item #9 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

Describe the professional development necessary to support the strategies. The team must include strategies to ensure that all students are taught by highly qualified teachers.

 

Professional Development

Escalante Valley Elementary School will establish a training schedule for professional development focused on the needs of teachers and students.  At the end of each year, the principal and literacy coaches, along with the teachers will look at SAGE scores and other assessments to determine areas where professional development is needed.  Weekly grade-level collaboration meetings will also be used to determine how students are doing and what areas of professional development are needed.

 

Teachers have been trained in the use of Smart Boards and are encouraged to use them in the classroom to enhance their Tier I instruction.  Upper Grades teachers are trained in the use of chromebooks and all teachers attend technology trainings through our district and SEDC.  Lower grade are encouraged to use in room multi-point stations to aide in there Tier I instruction.

 

Staff development is currently focusing on our new language arts program, CKLA, and the Language Arts Core.  Teachers will teach is with fidelity, as it is designed to cover every part of the core and builds over grade levels. 

 

Teachers are also being trained in a Tier 1 Text core program offered by the University of Utah Reading Clinic.  This program helps teachers become more effective and efficient at delivering Tier 1 instruction in language arts so that all G2+ readers, especially those who struggle, improve fluency and comprehension in grade-level texts/

 

Title I and special ed. paraprofessionals receive training from certified professionals and the literacy coaches in Early Steps, Next Steps and Higher Steps intensive intervention.

Scientifically Based Research Support

The National Reading Panel's analysis has made it clear that the best approach to reading instruction is one that incorporates explicit instruction in phonemic awareness, systematic phonics instruction, methods to improve fluency, and ways to enhance comprehension.  All trainings focus on these critical areas.

 

Early Steps, Next Steps, and Higher Steps programs are research-based interventions that can be used one-on-one or in small groups.  They meet the recommendations of the National Reading Panel.

Expected Impact in Core Academic Areas

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>In Math we will expect to see an increase in our percent of students proficient on the SAGE summative math test from 58.9% to 61.9%

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>In Language Arts we will increase both Proficiency and MGP by 5 percentage points on the SAGE Assessment.  From 64% to 69% Proficient and MGP from 56% to 61%.  

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>In grades K-3, the number of students reaching benchmark on the DIBELS Next Assessment will increase.

Budget and Funding Sources

Quality Teaching monies, Title I funds, Trust Lands monies

Timeline

Ongoing

 

Responsible Parties

Trevor Heaton, Krystal Munns, Leslie Adams

Evaluation Process (How Will Success Be Measured?)

To evaluate the effectiveness of professional development, data teams, follow-up meetings, and classroom observations will be conducted.  Teachers will have the opportunity to collaborate and discuss with other members of their team, the problems or successes they encountered in their individual classrooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Recruitment and Retention of Highly Qualified Teachers

    ESEA 1114(b)(1)(E)

   Refer to item #10 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

Strategies are implemented to attract, recruit, and retain highly qualified teachers in high need schools.

 

 

Describe strategies, policies, incentives to recruit and retain teachers.

 

Escalante Valley Elementary makes every effort to attract and recruit highly qualified teachers.  The school administration allows and encourages the use of student teachers from a local accredited university (SUU).  The administration will observe and evaluate student teachers to assess their teaching abilities.

 

The atmosphere of our school is such that retention is not a problem.  Each year there are numerous applicants and transfer requests allowing us to higher only exemplary teachers.

 

Provisional teachers (those in their first three years), will receive EYE training through the school district.  Provisional teachers will also be assigned a trained mentor to assist them as they work toward their Level II Professional Educator License.

 

Escalante Valley Elementary surveys teachers to assess endorsement interests and needs.  Endorsements are offered in accordance with survey findings and available funding.  The school district and the local university work together to provide endorsement opportunities and the necessary classes to complete the endorsements.  The following endorsements are currently being offered:  reading, ESL, and math.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Parent Involvement

    ESEA 1114 (b)(2(B)ii

    ESEA 1114(b)(2)(B)iv

   Refer to items #16 and #17 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

Please answer the following and attach documentation as needed.

 

Describe the processes used to involve parents in the development of the school-wide planning process.  Attach copies of communications that were mailed or sent home, agenda with roll signatures, meeting notices, meeting minutes, etc.

 

PTO parents are invited to look over the plan and make suggestions.  Parents are also invited to attend the Iron County School District Tittle I planning meeting.

 

 

Describe how school-wide plans will be made available to parents and the public in an understandable and uniform format.

 

At the beginning of each school year a summary of our Title I Plan, Parent Involvement Policy and Parent Compact are mailed home with a welcome back letter to parents.  It includes an invite to come to the school at any time and look at the comprehensive plan. We also have Bi-Annual Arts show where parent attend and see amazing performances and examples of integrated Arts.  The school also hold and annual parent training on a variety of topics.

There is also a link on our school website where parents can read about Title I.

Identify the parent involvement strategies that the school will use to involve parents.

 

All teachers are required to communicate with parents through a weekly newsletter.  Included in the newsletter are:  academic objectives for the week, upcoming events, weekly test scores, and student behavior.  In addition, parents will made aware of the following throughout the year.

 

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Back to School Night

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Christmas and End of Year Arts Nights.

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Student Education Plans (S.E.P.’s), twice a year

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Classroom Volunteers

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>P.T.O. meetings

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Dads and Donuts- Moms and Muffins

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Book Fairs

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Field Trips

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Halloween Carnival

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>All-School Christmas Program

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Maturation Program

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>DARE Graduation

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Field Day

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Kindergarten and 6th Grade Graduations

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Red Ribbon Week

<![if !supportLists]>?      <![endif]>Elementary Choir Performances

 

 

Detailed, semester reports will be sent home to inform parents of the progress of their child.  This includes students who qualify for special ed.  They will also receive quarterly progress reports from the special ed. teachers.  The reports will include current academic progress of their child, as well as their behavior.  Parents of  3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th graders have the opportunity to access their child’s grades at any time via internet access to the grade program, using a specified username and password.

Parents will also be notified as to DIBELS assessment results, three times a year (beginning, middle, and end).

The math program, Go Math, has an online help “Think Central” to help parents as they work with their students at home.

Kindergarten parents are invited, in the fall, to attend a parent meeting where kindergarten goals are discussed and materials are shared to help with practice at home and assist in meeting those goals.

Parenting videos and books, provided by the school counselor, are available for check-out in our school library.

            If a child is not meeting the performance standards, teachers will call for a parent-teacher conference to discuss what the school and parents can do to improve student performance.

            A take-home library is available for lower grade classrooms and struggling upper grade readers.  Books are delivered to them daily, on their individual reading level, to be read each night and returned the next day.  Parents also have the opportunity to sign up for summer take-home library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.  Transition from early childhood programs to local elementary school programs (Elementary schools only)

      ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(G)

     Refer to item #11 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

In school-wide program schools, there is clear evidence of transition activities between early childhood programs/home and the local elementary school.

 

Description of communication

 

 

The school begins notifying the public about kindergarten registration several weeks before the actual date.  This is accomplished by newspaper, student newsletters,  notices /fliers around town and at local preschools, and posting on the school marquee.  The local preschools notify the school of students who will be entering kindergarten.

 

 

 

 

 

Description of collaboration efforts

Transition IEPs are scheduled in the spring with parents, preschool teacher and special ed. teachers for those students requiring special services.  The reading specialist has provided preschool teachers in town with the state preschool curriculum.  The principal is involved with yearly Head Start evaluations.

 

 

 

Description of transition activities

 

 

All incoming kindergarten students are invited in the spring to attend kindergarten registration where they meet their teachers and are assessed on kindergarten readiness skills. Parents of incoming kindergarten students are given kindergarten materials in phonemic awareness, phonics, and a small book and instructed in how to use them in preparation for their kindergarten experience.

 

 

Children at local preschools take a field trip, in the spring, to the school to spend time with the kindergarten teachers in their classrooms.  This helps students become familiar and be comfortable with their transition to elementary school.

 

Some preschools also hold their graduation here at the elementary school.

 

 

 

Students and parents meet one-on-one with the kindergarten teacher before school begins.  During this time, the child is assessed and kindergarten is explained to the parents.  This assessment is also used to determine which students will be involved in our extended day kindergarten program.

 

During the fall SEP week, kindergarten parents are invited to the school, given additional materials to use at home, and information as to how they can further help their child have a successful kindergarten year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Decisions regarding the use of assessments

    ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(H)

    Refer to item #12 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

In school-wide program schools, teachers are included in decisions regarding the use of assessments.

 

 

What assessments will be used to measure student progress and inform instruction?

 

Literacy:

DIBELS Next –Guides instruction and show student progress in reading

DIBELS Progress Monitoring:  2 times each month on students showing any risk

SAGE – Guides instruction in LA/writing (3-6)

Reading Level Assessment (RLA)– Guides instruction and show student progress (1-6)

Kindergarten Assessment – Guides instruction and show student progress

Early Reading Instrument (ERI) - Guides instruction and show student progress (1)

Qualitative Reading Inventory (QRI) - Guides instruction and show student progress

CORE Reading Program Assessments - Guide instruction and show student progress

 

Math:

Go Math - Guides instruction and shows student progress

SAGE - Guides instruction in math (3-6)

 

 

Please describe how teachers were included in decisions regarding the use of assessments.

 

DIBELS Next, SAGE and Go Math are mandated by district and state.  However the teachers were unhappy with previous reading assessments and math programs.  Other alternatives were researched and presented to the teachers.  They voted on which assessments and programs would best meet their needs.

 

The kindergarten assessment has recently been revamped after several meetings to discuss changes that needed to be made.  Kindergarten teachers and reading teachers were involved in those meetings.

 

Teachers also develop their own assessments to guide their own instructional needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Students who experience difficulty mastering academic achievement standards

     ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(I)

    Refer to item #13 of the Utah Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook

 

 

In school-wide program schools, procedures are in place to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering any of the proficient or advanced levels of academic standards are provided timely and additional assistance.

 

 

How will the school identify which students experience difficulty in mastering academic standards?

 

In literacy two main assessments are used, DIBELS Next screening and the Reading Level Assessment (RLA).  Teacher observation and recommendation are also taken into consideration.

 

Go Math assesses students at the end of every unit.

 

Students struggling with mastering academic standards will be identified in monthly grade-level collaboration meetings and placed in Tier II intervention.

 

 

What interventions will the school provide for students experiencing difficulty in mastering academic standards?

 

 

In literacy, students below benchmark on DIBLES and/or below grade level on the RLA or the ERI, are placed in Early Steps, Next Steps, or Higher Steps intervention, one-one-one or small group.  Occasionally other intervention groups such as fluency or comprehension are formed. We also use an Americore volunteer and The STAR reading intervention.

 

Students struggling in reading are progress monitored twice a month.  All students are monitored once a month.

 

Students struggling in math are placed in Tier II small groups or attend study hall where they are given further instruction and practice.  Teaching assistants also attend individual classroom after Tier I instruction to aide struggling student and make sure concept are learned.

 

How will the school evaluate the effectiveness of the chosen interventions and make adjustments as needed?

In literacy, DIBLES progress monitoring is administered twice a month.  A midyear DIBELS Next is also given.  All students are involved in small group intervention.  Higher students are given more challenging skills to help them improve. 

 Students who make benchmark may be removed from intervention.  Students who fall below benchmark will continue intervention or may be added to intervention.  These groups are fluid and change often, based on data, T.A., and teacher recommendations.

 

In Go Math, concepts are constantly revisited and retested, therefore students not showing progress on assessments are retained in tier II instruction until they show mastery of the skill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. Coordination of Budgets (Federal, State, Local funds)

       ESEA 1114 (b)(1)(J)

     (#14 of Title I Part A Monitoring Handbook)

 

In school-wide program schools, there is coordination and integration of federal, state, and local services and programs.

 

Program Funding Source

Allocation

Describe how the funding sources will support the schoolwide plan.